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How the COVID pandemic changed digital journalism

So much more is now being asked of broadcast and digital journalists, but with that has come greater freedom to source and create stories. Fewer editors, videographers, lighting and sound technicians mean journalists are more in control of the way they weave and distribute their news. Coupled with that is the removal of traditional PR “gatekeepers” and the rise of media-savvy figures who understand the importance of being accessible via social media and directly engaging with journalists. Continue reading How the COVID pandemic changed digital journalism

REPUBLISHED: How our residential aged-care system doesn’t care about older people’s emotional needs

Republished from The Conversation Most aged-care residents don’t feel like they are loved or belong in their facility. Image from shutterstock.com Lee-Fay Low, University of Sydney All humans have fundamental needs. These are physiological (food, drink, clothing, sleep), safety (emotional … Continue reading REPUBLISHED: How our residential aged-care system doesn’t care about older people’s emotional needs

Republished; Five common myths about the ageing brain and body

Republished with thanks from The Conversation Will you still be able to do the crossword when you’re 80? Yep, better than ever, probably. from http://www.shutterstock.com.au Hannah Keage, University of South Australia and Blossom Christa Maree Stephan, Newcastle University This article is … Continue reading Republished; Five common myths about the ageing brain and body

Republished; Simple thinking in a complex world is a recipe for disaster

In an era of post-truth and pseudoscience, what can you do?

Our “LifeFlip” initiative – which is using the “Afternoon Conversations with Ron” to tease out some of the complexities we face as we age in particular, is one way we are working to improve our world. In particular,‘Life Flip’ is the exploration of what our life will look like as contributing and valuable citizens in our later years ie past the 60+ of typical retirement. Continue reading Republished; Simple thinking in a complex world is a recipe for disaster

Republished; If this is the Facebook election, the major parties should be a little concerned

If Facebook is a microcosm of wider electoral feeling, Turnbull has work to do. But the main message from Facebook is that, between them, the nation’s two main political leaders are “liked” online by less than 2.5% of eligible voters. Continue reading Republished; If this is the Facebook election, the major parties should be a little concerned

How social media is changing the church

Republished from The Conversation Bex Lewis, Manchester Metropolitan University Over the Easter weekend, the Church of England encouraged its congregation to share photos of their services and celebrations on social media using the hashtag #EasterJoy. It’s not strange for a … Continue reading How social media is changing the church

#ausvotes Revisited: Social Media in the 2013 Australian Federal Election

Republished from The Conversation Axel Bruns, Queensland University of Technology As Australia commences one of the longest federal election campaigns in living memory, much attention will be paid again to how parties and politicians are utilising the latest tools available … Continue reading #ausvotes Revisited: Social Media in the 2013 Australian Federal Election

Please ‘like’ me: why Facebook might be the key to success in the 2016 election

Republished from The Conversation Andrea Carson, University of Melbourne Another big week in federal politics is underway, with the budget announced on Tuesday. Then, possibly this weekend, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will formally call a double-dissolution election for July 2. … Continue reading Please ‘like’ me: why Facebook might be the key to success in the 2016 election

Who benefits from media reform? If history is any guide, it’s not the public

RePublished from by Vincent O’Donnell, RMIT University The “most significant media reform in Australia in a generation”, as unveiled by Communications Minister Mitch Fifield earlier this month, is no reform. It is a capitulation to the interests of licensees, shareholders and … Continue reading Who benefits from media reform? If history is any guide, it’s not the public

Republished; Connecting online can help prevent social isolation in older people

Jenny Waycott, University of Melbourne John*, a widower, is a retired engineer aged in his 90s. He lives alone in the family home and has struggled with loneliness and depression since his wife passed away. He feels frustrated that as … Continue reading Republished; Connecting online can help prevent social isolation in older people

Keep an eye on vocal fry – it’s all about power, status and gender

Cate Madill, University of Sydney Much has been written about vocal fry in recent years, with the focus on what it is, where it comes from and what it means. For those who don’t know, the term refers to the lowest vocal register, where the vocal cords are tightly closed for a very long time in the vibration pattern, resulting in a low pitched, creaky voice. Some of the most recent commentary has focused on how women who use vocal fry are perceived, with detractors and champions, researchers and social commentators weighing in on what is a growing phenomenon. So … Continue reading Keep an eye on vocal fry – it’s all about power, status and gender

Australian court holds Google responsible for linking to defamatory websites

Nicolas Suzor, Queensland University of Technology The South Australian Supreme Court this week found that Google is legally responsible when its search results link to defamatory content on the web. In this long-running case, Dr Janice Duffy has been trying for more than six years to clear her name and remove links to defamatory material when people search for her using Google. The main culprit is the US based website Ripoff Reports, where people have posted negative reviews of Dr Duffy. Under United States law, defamation is very hard to prove, and US websites are not liable for comments made … Continue reading Australian court holds Google responsible for linking to defamatory websites

The way we tell stories is evolving along with our smartphones

As well as using our phones more, we are also accessing multiple forms of content on these devices. We make and watch videos, we take and share photos. We chatter. We play games. We watch movies and TV. We listen. And we read. We read texts and messages, we read social media feeds, we read journalism, we read gossip, we read commentary. A lot of the time we spend staring at our phones we are reading. Continue reading The way we tell stories is evolving along with our smartphones

Why it’s time to unshackle yourself from old ideas about ‘the stages of life’

Around age 40 to 50, our body begins to deteriorate. Permanent strains and greying hair are just the beginning, soon followed by glasses and hearing aids. Women become infertile, and other losses in function leaves us needing pacemakers and hip replacements. Continue reading Why it’s time to unshackle yourself from old ideas about ‘the stages of life’

Dr Google can improve older people’s health – if we bridge the technology gap

Republished David Tuffley, Griffith University and Amy Antonio, University of Southern Queensland With more health information going online every day, it has never been easier to proactively manage our health. The problem is, the people who would benefit the most … Continue reading Dr Google can improve older people’s health – if we bridge the technology gap

No, Tony Abbott, you can’t dismiss social media as ‘electronic graffiti’

Like all forms of human expression, graffiti – including its electronic form – has a wide range of quality. Abbott’s narrow view of graffiti seems to confuse the banality of “X woz here” with graffiti as a tool of subversion and a medium for the expression of political criticism and social outrage. Continue reading No, Tony Abbott, you can’t dismiss social media as ‘electronic graffiti’

Australia tweeted #illridewithyou – and showed great solidarity in a moment of crisis

All this might make the popularity of the #illridewithyou hashtag surprising. But what really underpins this social media phenomenon is the fact that ordinary people are not only aware but are prepared to do something about the Islamophobia that ordinary Muslims face in the current climate. Continue reading Australia tweeted #illridewithyou – and showed great solidarity in a moment of crisis